Table 1

Summary of nine peer-reviewed publications published between 2008 and 2018, documenting pet feeding practices in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the USA, compared with the present study

ReferenceYear publishedCountrySurvey methodPopulationDemographicsSpecies (sample size)
32008Australia
USA
TelephoneRandomised Australian and USA citizens from local phone bookNot reportedCats (469)
Dogs (635)
412008UKPaper – in clinicClients of private and charity veterinary practicesNot reportedDogs (800)
422009AustraliaPaper – in postRandomised residents from Sydney phone bookNot reportedCats (198)
432010UKPaper+interview in personClients of private and charity veterinary practices69% female;
Age: 23% 18–35 years, 39% 36–50 years, 24% 51–65 years, 12% >65 years old
Dogs (696)
442010AustraliaPaper – in clinicMelbourne residents attending veterinary clinics and dog-related community events81% female;
Mean age 41.9 years (SD 13.8)
Dogs (182)
452013CanadaPaper – in clinicMedical clinic patientsNot reportedCats (199)
Dogs (274)
182014Canada
USA
eSurveyDog breedersNot reportedDogs (1913)
462015AustraliaTelephone interview, eSurveyRandomly selected households from online community panel76% female;
Age 38% 18–25 years, 16% 26–35 years, 15% 36–45 years, 27% 46–60 years, 5% >60 years
Cats (46)
Dogs (85)
402017USAInterview in personAgility trial participantsNot reportedDogs (494)
Present studyAustralia
Canada
New Zealand
UK
USA
Other
eSurveyOwners of dogs and cats92% female;
Age: 3% <20 years, 23% 21–30 years, 18% 31–40 years, 20% 41–50 years, 22% 51–60 years, 12% 61–70 years, 3% >70 years
Cats (1542)
Dogs (2940)