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Use of cefovecin in dogs and cats attending first-opinion veterinary practices in Australia
  1. Laura Hardefeldt1,2,
  2. Brian Hur1,2,3,
  3. Karin Verspoor3,4,
  4. Timothy Baldwin3,
  5. Kirsten E Bailey1,2,
  6. Ri Scarborough1,2,
  7. Suzanna Richards1,5,
  8. Helen Billman-Jacobe1,2,
  9. Glenn Francis Browning1,2 and
  10. James Gilkerson2
  1. 1National Centre for Antimicrobial Stewardship, Carlton, Victoria, Australia
  2. 2Asia Pacific Centre for Animal Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  3. 3School of Computing and Information Systems, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  4. 4Health and Biomedical Informatics Centre, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  5. 5Veterinary Biosciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Laura Hardefeldt, Asia-Pacific Centre for Animal Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; laura.hardefeldt{at}unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Background Cefovecin is a long-acting third-generation cephalosporin commonly used in veterinary medicine. Third-generation cephalosporins are critically important antimicrobials that should only be used after culture and susceptibility testing. The authors describe the common indications for cefovecin use in dogs and cats, and the frequency of culture and susceptibility testing.

Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was performed using clinical records extracted from VetCompass Australia. A previously described method was used to identify records containing cefovecin. The reason for cefovecin use was annotated in situ in each consultation text.

Results Over a six-month period (February and September 2018), 5180 (0.4 per cent) consultations involved cefovecin administration, of which 151 were excluded. Cats were administered cefovecin more frequently than dogs (1.9 per cent of cat consultations and 0.1 per cent of dog consultations). The most common reasons for cefovecin administration to cats were cat fight injuries and abscesses (28 per cent) and dermatitis (13 per cent). For dogs, the most common reasons for cefovecin administration were surgical prophylaxis (24 per cent) and dermatitis (19 per cent). Culture and susceptibility testing were reported in 16 cases (0.3 per cent).

Conclusion Cefovecin is used in many scenarios in dogs and cats where antimicrobials may be either not indicated or where an antimicrobial of lower importance to human health is recommended.

  • antimicrobial stewardship
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • canine
  • feline
  • cephalosporin
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Footnotes

  • Funding This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council through the Centres of Research Excellence programme (grant no. 1079625). BH was a recipient of an Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data may be obtained from a third party and are not publicly available. Data are available on agreement with VetCompass Australia (info@vetcompass.com.au).

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