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Survival estimates and outcome predictors in dogs with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus treated in a veterinary teaching hospital
  1. Antonio Maria Tardo,
  2. Francesca Del Baldo,
  3. Francesco Dondi,
  4. Marco Pietra,
  5. Roberto Chiocchetti and
  6. Federico Fracassi
  1. Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Ozzano dell'Emilia, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Professor Federico Fracassi; federico.fracassi{at}unibo.it

Abstract

Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs, but prognostic factors are still largely unknown. The aim of this retrospective, single-centre, case series study was to determine overall survival time and identify the prognostic value of several clinical and clinicopathological variables in dogs with newly diagnosed DM.

Methods Cases of DM were identified within the electronic medical records of one referral centre. Sixty-eight dogs with DM were included. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyse variables associated with survival.

Results The median survival time was 964 days (range 22–3140). In multivariable model analysis, length of survival was significantly shorter for dogs with higher haematocrit value (hazard ratio (HR) 1.06, 95 per cent confidence interval (CI) 1.00 to 1.13) and higher serum phosphate concentrations (HR 1.83, 95 per cent CI 1.13 to 2.97). Serum phosphate concentrations were above the reference interval in 24 of 65 (37 per cent) dogs.

Conclusion Diabetic dogs have a good life expectancy. Hyperphosphataemia is a relatively common finding in dogs with newly diagnosed DM and represents a negative prognostic factor. The presence of pancreatitis might not be associated with an unfavourable outcome.

  • insulin
  • dogs
  • diabetes mellitus
  • therapy
  • survival time
  • canine
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Footnotes

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement All data relevant to the study are included in the article.

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