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Association of lameness and mastitis with return-to-service oestrus detection in the dairy cow
  1. John Remnant1,
  2. Martin J Green1,
  3. Jon Huxley2,
  4. James Hirst-Beecham1,
  5. Rhys Jones1,
  6. George Roberts3 and
  7. Chris David Hudson1
  1. 1 School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK
  2. 2 School of Veterinary Science, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
  3. 3 Hafren Vets, Newtown, UK
  1. Correspondence to John Remnant, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK; john.remnant{at}nottingham.ac.uk

Abstract

Oestrus detection is an important part of maintaining efficient reproductive performance in dairy herds. Both lameness and mastitis are common diseases of dairy cows that may impact oestrus detection. A set of data from 28 herds identified as having good recording of clinical mastitis and lameness incidents was used for the study. Logistic regression was used to identify associations between disease episodes within 100 days of insemination and changes in the probability of reinsemination at either 18–24 or 19–26 days after an unsuccessful insemination. Population attributable risk was calculated to understand the impact these diseases may have at a herd level. Lameness 0–28 days after the first insemination of the interval decreased the odds of a reinsemination at an appropriate time by approximately 20 per cent. Clinical mastitis 1–28 days prior to the first insemination of the interval increased the odds of reinsemination at the expected time by approximately 20 per cent. The associations were similar for either interservice interval outcome. Population attributable risk suggested that the effect of these diseases on the probability of reinsemination at the expected time at a population level would likely be extremely small.

  • dairy cattle
  • lameness
  • mastitis
  • fertility
  • reproduction
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Footnotes

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement No data are available.

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