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Retrospective evaluation of 140 dogs involved in road traffic accidents
  1. Sigal Klainbart, DVM, DACVECC1,
  2. Uri Bibring, DVM, IVDIS2,
  3. Dalia Strich, DVM1,
  4. Orit Chai, DVM, DECVN3,
  5. Tali Bdolah-Abram, MSc4,
  6. Itamar Aroch, DVM, DECVIM (Internal Medicine)5 and
  7. Efrat Kelmer, MSc, DVM, DACVECC1
  1. 1Department of Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care, The Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
  2. 2Department of Radiology, The Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
  3. 3Department of Neurology, The Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
  4. 4The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Rehovot, Israel
  5. 5Small Animal Internal Medicine, The Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel
  1. E-mail for correspondenceDepartment of Small Animal Emergency and Critical CareThe Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of JerusalemRehovotIsrael; klainbart{at}gmail.com

Abstract

This study has retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 140 dogs sustaining road traffic accident (RTA), and has examined the population characteristics, medical history, injury type, physical examination, emergency laboratory tests and radiography findings, the animal trauma triage (ATT) score, the length of hospitalisation, the complications and the outcome. The survival rate was 83.2 per cent. Younger dogs sustained more frequently lung contusions and limb fractures, while larger dogs more frequently suffered limb fractures, and smaller dogs and older ones sustained more frequently pelvic fractures and sacroiliac luxation (P<0.05 for all). Dogs sustaining orthopaedic injuries required longer hospitalisation (P<0.001). The survival rates of non-ambulatory dogs (P<0.001) and those with neurological abnormalities (P<0.001), abnormal body temperature (P=0.001), hyperglycaemia (P=0.026) or hypoproteinaemia (P=0.04) at presentation were lower compared with those in which these were absent. The number of injured body systems was significantly (P<0.001) and positively associated with death. Dogs surviving RTA to presentation to the hospital have a good prognosis for survival to discharge. Older age, and high ATT score, abnormal body temperature, neurological deficits, hyperglycaemia and hypoproteinaemia at presentation, and occurrence of multiorgan trauma are negative prognostic indicators in such dogs.

  • canine
  • trauma
  • vehicular
  • vehicle
  • motor
  • hit by car

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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