Article Text

PDF

Review
Equine metabolic syndrome
  1. R. Morgan, MA, VetMB, CertAVP, DipECEIM, MRCVS1,
  2. J. Keen, BVetMed, PhD, CertEM, DipECEIM, MRCVS, RCVS2 and
  3. C. McGowan, BVSc, MACVS, PhD, DEIM, DipECEIM, MRCVS, RCVS3
  1. 1BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, The Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK
  2. 2European Specialist in Equine Internal Medicine, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Campus, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK
  3. 3European Specialist in Equine Internal Medicine, Institute of Aging and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Neston, Cheshire CH64 7TE, UK
  1. E-mail for correspondence: c.m.mcgowan{at}liverpool.ac.uk

Abstract

Laminitis is one of the most common and frustrating clinical presentations in equine practice. While the principles of treatment for laminitis have not changed for several decades, there have been some important paradigm shifts in our understanding of laminitis. Most importantly, it is essential to consider laminitis as a clinical sign of disease and not as a disease in its own right. Once this shift in thinking has occurred, it is logical to then question what disease caused the laminitis. More than 90 per cent of horses presented with laminitis as their primary clinical sign will have developed it as a consequence of endocrine disease; most commonly equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Given the fact that many horses will have painful protracted and/or chronic recurrent disease, a good understanding of the predisposing factors and how to diagnose and manage them is crucial. Current evidence suggests that early diagnosis and effective management of EMS should be a key aim for practising veterinary surgeons to prevent the devastating consequences of laminitis. This review will focus on EMS, its diagnosis and management.

Open Access This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.