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NetF-positive Clostridium perfringens in neonatal foal necrotising enteritis in Kentucky
  1. I. Mehdizadeh Gohari, DVM, MSc1,
  2. V. R. Parreira, PhD1,
  3. J. F. Timoney, MVB, PhD, DSc2,
  4. L. Fallon, DVM3,
  5. N. Slovis, DVM, DACVIM3 and
  6. J. F. Prescott, Vet, MB, PhD1
  1. 1Department of Pathobiology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1, Canada
  2. 2Department of Veterinary Science, Gluck Equine Research Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0099, USA
  3. 3Hagyard Equine Veterinary Science, 4250 Iron Works Pike, Lexington, KY 40511- 8412, USA
  1. Correspondence to E-mail for correspondence: prescott{at}uoguelph.ca

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TYPE A Clostridium perfringens has been associated with necrotising enteritis in 1–14-day-old foals in Kentucky (Donahue and Williams 2002, Timoney and others 2005) but the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, in part because few affected foals die and thus the availability of postmortem samples is rare. An autogenous bacterin-toxoid vaccine utilising a C. perfringens Type A strain (UK MF 05/00) that carries genes for the α toxin (CPA), β2 toxin (CPB2) and enterotoxin (CPE), further enriched with recombinant CPB2 toxin, is used to immunise mares on Kentucky breeding farms with histories of foal diarrhoea (Timoney and others 2005). Recently, a novel pore-forming toxin NetF has been strongly associated with foal necrotising enteritis and canine haemorrhagic gastroenteritis (Mehdizadeh Gohari and others 2015). Here, the authors report for the first time the identification of netF-positive type A C. perfringens in foals with enteritis and enterocolitis in Kentucky and …

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