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Detection of anthelmintic resistance on two Irish beef research farms
  1. J. O'Shaughnessy1,3,
  2. B. Earley, PhD1,
  3. J. F. Mee, PhD4,
  4. M. L. Doherty, PhD3,
  5. P. Crosson, PhD2,
  6. D. Barrett, DipECBHM5,
  7. R. Prendiville, PhD2,
  8. M. Macrelli, DVM6 and
  9. T. de Waal, PhD3
  1. 1Animal and Bioscience Research Department, Animal Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc, Grange, Dunsany, Co. Meath, Ireland
  2. 2Livestock Systems Department, Animal Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc, Grange, Dunsany, Co. Meath, Ireland
  3. 3School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
  4. 4Animal and Bioscience Research Department, Animal Grassland Research and Innovation Centre, Teagasc, Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork, Ireland
  5. 5DAFM, Sligo Regional Veterinary Laboratory, Doonally, Co. Sligo, Ireland
  6. 6Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Via Celoria 10, Milano 20133, Italy
  1. E-mail for correspondence:james.oshaughnessy{at}teagasc.ie

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Beef and milk production systems in Ireland are largely dependent on a grass-based diet with cattle spending long periods of the year at pasture (Drennan and McGee 2009). As a result, cattle are frequently exposed to gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) challenge. Within grass-based production systems, anthelmintics are essential to optimising performance and any reduction in their efficacy may lead to reduced animal performance. Although anthelmintic resistance (AR) is more commonly reported in sheep (Sutherland and Leathwick 2011), it has been increasingly reported in cattle worldwide (Stafford and Coles 1999, Loveridge and others 2003, Soutello and others 2007, Demeler and others 2009, Edmonds and others 2010). To date, there have been no published reports of AR in cattle in Ireland.

We report the findings of a faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) conducted at two Irish agricultural research farms (Study A and B). Two different software programmes were used to determine anthelmintic efficacy.

All animal procedures performed in this study were conducted under experimental license (B100/2869) from the Irish Department of Health and Children, in accordance with the Cruelty to Animals Act 1876 and the European Communities (Amendment of Cruelty to Animals Act 1876) Regulation 2002 and 2005.

Study A was conducted at Teagasc, Johnstown Castle, Wexford, Co. Wexford, Ireland (longitude 6°30′ W; latitude 52°17′ N; …

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