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Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in bioaerosols after depopulation and cleaning of two cattle barns
  1. S. Eisenberg, DVM1,
  2. M. Nielen, DVM, PhD, ECVPH1,
  3. J. Hoeboer1,
  4. M. Bouman, DVM, PhD1,
  5. D. Heederik, PhD2 and
  6. A. Koets1
  1. Department of Farm Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 7, 3584 CL, Utrecht, The Netherland
  2. Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Utrecht University, PO Box 80.178, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands
  1. E-mail for correspondence s.w.f.eisenberg{at}uu.nl
  • Dr Hoeboer is also at the Division of Immunology, Department of Infectious Disease and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL Utrecht, The Netherlands

Settled dust samples were collected on a commercial dairy farm in the Netherlands with a high prevalence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) (barn A) and on a Dutch experimental cattle farm (barn B) stocked with cattle confirmed to be MAP shedders. Barns were sampled while animals were present, after both barns were destocked and cleaned by cold high-pressure cleaning, and after being kept empty for two weeks (barn A) or after additional disinfection (barn B). MAP DNA was detected by IS900 real-time PCR and viable MAP were detected by liquid culture. MAP DNA was detected in 78 per cent of samples from barn A and 86 per cent of samples from barn B collected while animals were still present. Viable MAP was detected in six of nine samples from barn A and in three of seven samples from barn B. After cold high-pressure cleaning, viable MAP could be detected in only two samples from each barn. After leaving barn A empty for two weeks, and following additional disinfection of barn B, no viable MAP could be detected in any settled dust sample.

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Footnotes

  • Provenance not commissioned; externally peer reviewed

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