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Relationship between the serum concentrations of serotonin and lipids and aggression in dogs
  1. D. Çakiroǧlu, PhD1,
  2. Y. Meral, PhD1,
  3. A. A. Sancak, PhD3 and
  4. G. Çifti, DVM2
  1. 1 Department of Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ondokuz Mayis, 55139 Kurupelit, Samsun, Turkey
  2. 2 Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ondokuz Mayis, 55139 Kurupelit, Samsun, Turkey
  3. 3 Department of Internal Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ankara, Dişkapi, Ankara, Turkey

Abstract

The serum concentrations of serotonin and lipids — triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein and very low density lipoprotein — were determined in 18 normal dogs and 23 dogs diagnosed as aggressive on the basis of interviews with their owners and an assessment of their behaviour with reference to a canine overt aggression chart. The serum serotonin levels in the aggressive dogs were significantly lower than in the normal dogs (P<0·01), but the differences in serum lipids between the two groups were not statistically significant.

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