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Spatial analysis of the exposure of dogs in rural north-coastal California to vectorborne pathogens
  1. J. E. Foley, DVM, PhD1,
  2. R. N. Brown, DVM, PhD3,
  3. M. W. Gabriel, MS3,
  4. J. Henn, PhD2,
  5. N. Drazenovich, MS1,
  6. R. Kasten, PhD2,
  7. S. L. Green, DVM4 and
  8. B. B. Chomel, DVM, PhD2
  1. 1 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
  2. 2 Department of Population, Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
  3. 3 Department of Wildlife Biology, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521, USA
  4. 4 Veterinary Housecalls, Arcata, CA 95521, USA

Abstract

Between 0 and 50 per cent of the dogs in eight rural villages in far northern California with a high risk of tickborne diseases were seropositive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Bartonella vinsonii subspecies berkhoffii, and between 0 and 10 per cent were seropositive for Borrelia burgdorferi. The odds ratio for the co-exposure of individual dogs to B vinsonii berkhoffii and A phagocytophilum was 18·2. None of the diseases was associated with the sex of the dogs, whether they slept out of doors, or whether tick-preventive measures were taken. When the villages were assessed for landscape risk factors, a particularly high seroprevalence for B vinsonii berkhoffii and A phagocytophilum was observed in a village at a relatively high altitude and greater distance from the Pacific coast, and montane hardwood conifer woodland was most associated with a high seroprevalence for these two pathogens.

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