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Relationship of speed of slaughter on infected premises and intensity of culling of other premises to the rate of spread of the foot-and-mouth disease epidemic in Great Britain, 2001
  1. N. Honhold, BVSc, MSc, PhD, DipECVPH, MRCVS1,
  2. N.M. Taylor, BSc, BVSc, MSc, MRCVs2,
  3. L.M. Mansley, BVMS, MVM, MRCVS3 and
  4. A.D. Paterson, BVetMed, PhD, MRCVS4
  1. 1 Veterinary Epidemology Unit, Department for Agriculture and Rural Development, Dundonald House, Upper Newtownards Road, Belfast BT4 3SB
  2. 2 VEERU, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, Early GAte, PO Box 237, Reading RG6 6AR
  3. 3 Animal Health Divisional Office, SEERAD, Strathearn House, Broxden Business PArk, Lamberkine Drive, Perth PH1 1RX
  4. 4 International Animal Health Division, DEFRA, 1A Page Street, London SW1P 4PQ

Abstract

During the foot-and-mouth disease epidemic in the UK in 2001, two major control policies were the rapid identification of cases and the culling of animals on infected premises and on dangerous contact premises. Dangerous contact premises were divided into two groups, premises contiguous to an infected premises and non-contiguous premises. In England, the largest numbers of geographically clustered infected premises were in Cumbria, the South West (Somerset, Devon and Cornwall) and the Settle/Clitheroe area straddling the Yorkshire-Lancashire border. in each of these clusters, the rate of spread of the disease, the average time from the first lesion to slaughter on infected premises, and the intensity of culling of contiguous premises and non-contiguous premises were calculated for seven-day periods. Linear regression analysis was used to look for relationships between these factors and the rate of spread of the disease. The average time from the first lesion to slaughter had a statistically significant relationship in two of the three clusters and the intensity of culling of non-contiguous premises had a significant relationship in one. The intensity of culling of contiguous premises had no significant relationship in any of the three clusters.

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