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Survey of the views of graduates (1993 to 1997) on the undergraduate veterinary clinical curriculum in the British Isles
  1. J. L. Fitzpatrick, BVMS, PhD, MRCVS1 and
  2. D. J. Mellor, BVMS, PhD, MRCVS2
  1. 1 Division of Farm Animal Medicine and Production
  2. 2 Comparative Epidemiology and Informatics, Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, University of Glasgow Veterinary School, Bearsden Road, Glasgow G61 1QH
  1. Comparative Epidemiology and Informatics, Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, University of Glasgow Veterinary School, Bearsden Road, Glasgow G61 1QH

Abstract

In 1998 a questionnaire was sent to graduates from all the veterinary schools in Great Britain and Ireland who had obtained their veterinary degree within the previous five years, to assess their opinions of the undergraduate clinical veterinary curriculum. Ninety-five per cent of the graduates who responded were working full time in veterinary practice, with small animal work occupying 90 per cent of them for a median of 70 per cent of their time. Their assessment of the curriculum suggested that they were generally satisfied, but that there were some subjects they considered important in which the teaching and extramural studies had failed to provide adequate learning opportunities. Twelve subjects were rated as ‘very important’, two subjects, small animal medicine and anaesthesia, were considered to be ‘very well’ taught, and extramural studies were considered to be ‘very useful’ for three subjects, small animal surgery, cattle medicine and cattle surgery. The survey provided evidence that graduates are keen to continue learning and specialise after they graduate.

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