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Sick sinus syndrome in nine West Highland white terriers
  1. A. Moneva-Jordan, DVM,CertSAC, MRCVS1,1,
  2. B. M. Corcoran, MVB,PhD, MRCVS1,
  3. A. French, MVB, DVC,MRCVS1,
  4. J. Dukes-McEwan, BVMS,MVM, DVC, PhD, MRCVS1,
  5. M. W. S. Martin, MVB,DVC, MRCVS2,
  6. V. Luis Fuentes, MA,VetMB, MRCVS3,
  7. L. S. Hitchcock, DVM,DACVIM (Cardiology)3 and
  8. J. D. Bonagura, DVM, MS,DACVIM (Cardiology)3
  1. 1 Hospital for Small Animals, Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Veterinary Centre, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG
  2. 2 The Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Centre, Thera House, 43 Waverley Road, Kenilworth CV8 1JL
  3. 3 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Clydesdale Hall, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA
  1. Hospital for Small Animals, Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Veterinary Centre, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG

Abstract

Sick sinus syndrome is a clinical term used to describe the clinical signs of sinus node dysfundion. This paper describes the clinical data from nine West Highland white terriers, eight females and one male, in which a diagnosis of sick sinus syndrome was made. The most common clinical signs were episodic weakness and presyncope. Electrocardiographic findings included sinus bradycardia, sinus arrest with or without escape complexes, disturbances of atrioventricular conduction, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, or some combination of these dysrhythmias. The main radiographic changes were mild right-sided cardiomegaly in five cases, and a slight increase in bronchial and interstitial markings in four, but there was no evidence of congestive heart failure in any of the dogs. Echocardiography revealed mild to moderate mitral endocardiosis in three cases with no other significant abnormalities. The dogs' responses to parenteral atropine were variable and were not necessarily related to their response to oral anticholinergic agents. Five of the dogs were initially treated with propantheline bromide, but in only two of them were the clinical signs controlled in the long term. Six of the dogs were successfully treated by the implantation of a transvenous pacemaker.

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      Footnotes

      • Dr Moneva-Jordan's current address is The Ayres Veterinary Hospital, 19-21 Ayres Terrace, North Shields, Tyne and Wear NE29 0HL

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