Article Text

Relationship of calf antibody status to disease and performance
  1. GL Caldow,
  2. DG White,
  3. M Kelsey,
  4. AR Peters and
  5. KJ Solly
  1. Meat and Livestock Commission, Bletchley, Buckinghamshire.

Abstract

Three tests were used to measure the circulating immunoglobulin in 381 purchased calves as they entered a commercial calf-rearing unit. A correlation of 0.64 was found between the zinc sulphate turbidity (ZST) test and a quantitative latex agglutination test (LAT) measuring IgG1 (P less than 0.001). A qualitative version of the LAT related poorly to the quantitative version. The proportion of plasma samples identified by the quantitative LAT as having an IgG1 concentration of less than 5 g/litre which were incorrectly identified as positives (greater than or equal to 5 g/litre) by the qualitative LAT was 0.65. The proportion of plasma samples identified by the quantitative LAT as having a IgG1 concentration of greater than or equal to 5 g/litre which were incorrectly identified as negative (less than 5 g/litre) was 0.11. There was no statistically significant relationship between plasma IgG1 concentration and initial liveweight, subsequent overall daily liveweight gain or disease incidence (P greater than 0.05). Calves treated for infectious disease, particularly respiratory disease after weaning, had statistically significantly lower liveweight gains than healthy calves (P less than 0.001).

    Statistics from Altmetric.com

      Request permissions

      If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.