Article Text

Persistent anthelmintic activity of ivermectin in cattle
  1. J Armour,
  2. K Bairden,
  3. AF Batty,
  4. CC Davison and
  5. DB Ross

Abstract

Two studies are described which demonstrate the persistent activity of ivermectin injected subcutaneously into cattle at 200 micrograms/kg in preventing the establishment of induced infections with the gastrointestinal parasites Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora and the lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus. These results indicated a reduction in mean worm count compared with the control group for O ostertagi of more than 99, 45 and 94 per cent with a seven, 14 or 21 day interval between treatment with ivermectin and the administration of infective larvae, respectively, in trial 1 and more than 99, more than 99 and 99 per cent at seven, 10 or 14 days, respectively, in trial 2. Corresponding values against C oncophora were 99, 0 and 45 per cent at seven, 14 and 21 days in trial 1 and more than 99, 84 and 31 per cent at seven, 10 and 14 days in trial 2. Against D viviparus, reduction in counts were more than 99, 98 and more than 99 per cent at seven, 14 and 21 days, respectively, in trial 1 and 100, 100 and 100 per cent at seven, 10 and 14 days, respectively, in trial 2. The relevance of these results to the build-up of infective larvae on pasture and infection in cattle is discussed.

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